Mar 18, 2022

World Oral Health Day: Helping To Look After Your Child's Teeth.

World Oral Health Day

Today is World Oral Health Day, a day which aims to empower people with the knowledge, tools, and confidence to secure good oral health. Within our Early Years settings, promoting good oral health and hygiene is incredibly important. Teaching young child about their teeth and introducing good habits early will have a positive impact later in life.

When the new EYFS Framework came into effect in September 2021, one of the main changes was an addition to the welfare requirements where settings are now required to promote the ‘good oral health of children’.  This was introduced following research by Public Health England, which suggests that 1 in 5 children aged 5 have experienced tooth decay.

A child’s first experiences with oral health can have an impact on the rest of their life and so it is very important to teach young children about their mouth and introduce good habits as early as possible. Milk teeth are important and if children get used to good tooth brushing practices when they are young, they are more likely to continue these later on in life.

When and how to brush:

  • Birth to three years:  Teeth should be brushed twice a day using just a smear of a fluoride toothpaste.  This should start as soon as the first tooth appears and be closely supervised.
  • Children over 3 years:  Teeth should be brushed twice a day, using no more than a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste.  Children should be helped or supervised by an adult until at least the age of 7.

A healthy diet for teeth:

Tooth decay is caused by bacteria on teeth converting sugar into acid, which can make holes in teeth.  Tooth decay is the number one reason why children aged 5 to 9 are admitted to hospital for dental treatment under general anaesthetic.

Sugar is the general term used for a variety of substances that are used to sweeten foods and drinks.  It is a good idea to watch out for the different types of sugars, such as sucrose, glucose & fructose on food labels. While we automatically tend to think of sugar being in sweet foods, such as biscuits and cakes, sugar is added to many other foods too, for example tomato sauce, baby foods, cereals, yoghurts and juices.  The Government’s Eatwell Guide advises that sweet treats should be limited and, if eaten, should be consumed as part of a meal as the increased saliva produced will help to limit damage to the teeth.

Birth to one year:

  • Salt, sugar and artificial sweeteners should never be added to the food of young children
  • Fruit juices are not recommended before the age of one year
  • From around the age of 6 months, children should be encouraged to drink from a free-flow cup
  • From the age of 1 year, feeding from a bottle should be discouraged

From age one:

  • A balanced diet, with 5 portions of fruit and vegetables a day should be provided
  • Limit the amount and frequency of foods and drinks which contain sugars and ensure these are only consumed at mealtimes
  • Avoid processed foods and drinks, including baby food
  • Dried fruits, such as raisins are high in sugar, and also stick to teeth and so should not be eaten regularly, and only during mealtimes, not as a separate snack

Did you know?

  • A 300ml can of cola contains around 10 teaspoons of sugar
  • A 15ml serving of ketchup contains around 1 teaspoon of sugar
  • A 300ml carton of orange juice contains around 7.5 teaspoons of sugar

Visiting the Dentist:

It is a good idea to take babies to the dentist as soon as teeth begin to appear so that they can be monitored.  This also helps to ensure children are familiar with visiting the dentist from a young age, and as long as these visits are made into positive experiences, it should avoid children worrying about dentist trips in the future.

Further Reading: Children’s books to help support their oral health

  • Tooth – by Leslie Patricelli
  • Brush, Brush, Brush!  – by Alicia Padron
  • Tusk Trouble – by Jane Clarke and Cecilia Johansson
  • We’re Going to the Dentist: Going for a Check-Up – by Campbell Books & Marion Cocklico
  • Why should I brush my teeth? – by Katie Daynes and Marta Alvarez Miguens
  • Brush Your Teeth Please – by Leslie McGuire
  • Open Wide…What’s Inside? by Alex and Helen Rushworth
  • Peppa Pig: Dentist Trip
  • The Shark Who Bit Things He Shouldn’t – by Denis Bond

Written by Julie, Nursery Manager at The Old Station Nursery, Henley


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